Confirmed they are in talks about a possible of equals Tuesday, a tie up that could give the Canadian agricultural giants added clout if potash prices eventually recover, industry watchers say.The pairing would combine Saskatoon based Potash, which has access to about one fifth of the world supply of its namesake fertilizer ingredient, with Calgary based Agrium, a major agricultural producer and distributor with $15 billion in sales in 2015.Their discussions come amid a precipitous decline in the price of the crop nutrient, with Potash reporting an average realized price per tonne of US$154 in the second quarter, down from US$900 in 2008.But Dan Sherman, an analyst with Edward Jones who covers the sector, said there is reason to be optimistic about potash long term as the world population grows and needs more food, which in turn requires more of the fertilizer ingredient. Meanwhile, Agrium retail business would provide diversification to cushion Potash from the next commodities downturn, perhaps preventing the conditions that have wiped out two thirds of the latter market capitalization since the 2008 financial crisis.A merger make it an even more formidable force in the potash market, Sherman said. Both companies are allowed to pursue the strategy they currently have the combined entity would be very attractive.

Only problem, my feet are pretty wide. Right now I wear some cheap random Nike running shoes, size 12 regular width. I tried on some of the Frees today but they seemed a bit narrow, not awfully but I felt like it might be too much for all day wearing.

Our analysis found a strong correlation between deprivation and the number of people dying prematurely.Avoidable death rates range from 138 deaths per 100,000 in affluent areas such as Chiltern in Buckinghamshire, to 517 in the poorest parts of Belfast.He added: “It is scandalous that in 2018 people’s life chances are still determined by the postcode of the bed they were born in.”In England Chiltern, South Oxfordshire, South Cambridgeshire and Hart in Hampshire had the lowest avoidable death rates.Places with the highest rates include Manchester, Blackpool, Middlesbrough, Hull and Liverpool.A stark warning that he could be dead by next Christmas prompted father of two Mark Oldfield to take determined steps to avoid a premature death.Diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure the factory supervisor from Dudley topped 24 stone at his heaviest in January 2016.The 50 year old says he had always been overweight but when his doctor told him he was heading for an early grave it was the warning he needed to ditch his unhealthy ways and diet of takeaways, pizza, crisps, fizzy drinks and cider.He said: “My diet was typical of my lifestyle no time for anything, takeaways and jar sauces. I did no exercise and I once nearly got stuck in the turnstile at West Bromwich Albion because of my size.”I was morbidly obese. My doctor told me I was eating myself to an early grave and in December 2015, shortly after I experienced an episode of breathlessness and dizzy spells, his words ‘enjoy this Christmas it may be your last’ really hit home.”The warning came with a referral to a slimming group in Netherton on a 12 week programme which helped him to lose more than nine stone through healthy eating and an exercise plan.He said: “I think people become ignorant to weight problems, buy baggier clothes to hide it and carry on.